Seoul. At the other side of the world. And so different than Europe. Actually, it’s hard where to start looking around and staring. And for those of you who are as impressed as irritated by the exotic Korean culture I made a small personal list of some things you shouldn’t miss when you visit Seoul.

1. N Seoul Tower / Namsan Tower

The N Seoul Tower is located on top of Seoul’s highest mountain Namsan. From here you have a spectacular view over the whole city – on a clear day, of course. We were lucky, and it was so amazing. Can you believe how huge this city is?

Aussicht vom Berg Namsan, Seoul

First with an elevator, than with a cable car, you’ll get on top of Namsan mountain. There’s also a hiking trail, which takes over an one hour, but as the sightseeing schedule was tight and the feet lazy… well, you know how it is. Around the tower there are a lot of shops and restaurants, as well as some cultural events, so it’s a nice place to rest from sightseeing and enjoy the view.

The N Seoul Tower is the meeting point for all young lovers, apparently. All fences in the area around the Tower are covered with lovelocks, there are literally millions of them all around the place. Crazy stuff. Probably 98% of the world’s production of padlocks are found near the N Seoul Tower.

Liebesschlösser am Namsan Tower, Seoul

2. Gwangjang Food Market

Nothing for people with a sensitive stomach. Mainly a market for fabric, there’s also a small, but very impressive corner with street food. A challenge even for the most courageous eaters. Here you will find dog meat soup, pig tails and noses, live mini octopus ready to eat and undefined blood sausages. Basically everything you will need if you are training for the next season of “I’m a star – Get me out of here!” I didn’t try anything of these exotic dishes – when I saw the living worms in an aquarium, no eyes and wobbling around like living intestines I lost my appetite for the rest of the day. Eeeek.

But still, there are some tasty dishes around you should try – like the fresh pasta or the soy bean cakes!

3. Palaces in Seoul

There are a few palaces from the Joseon dynasty in Seoul – you should definitely visit one. The biggest is Gyeongbokgung Palace. You can read the full post here:

Seoul: Free entry at Gyeongbokgung Palace

Gyeongbokgung Palast, Seoul, Korea

4. Strange Cafés

Koreans love coffee. And especially in strange cafés.  Like the café Thanks Nature, whose main attraction are the two living sheep Lulu and Lala.

Or the Poop Café in Insadong. Here everything revolves around… poop. Poop stickers, poop pillows, soup served in little toilet bowls… Very strange.

5. Riding the metro

Zugegeben, die Berliner U-Bahn ist kein Maßstab. Aber in jeder U-Bahn in Seoul ist es so viel sauberer als zu Hause in meiner geliebt-verhassten U7. Böden so spiegelglatt, dass man davon essen könnte. Und selbst in der Rush Hour sind alle ruhig und diszipliniert, kein Gedränge, kein Geschiebe, keine schlechte Stimmung. BVG, hier könnt ihr echt mal was lernen.

Metro in Seoul, Korea

6. Koreanische Küche probieren

Wobei – eigentlich zwei Mal. Denn: kein Korea-Besuch ohne Bibimbap oder Korean Barbecue.

Bibimbap ist eigentlich nur eine Schale Reis mit frischem Gemüse und wahlweise Fleisch obenauf. Scharfe Soße rein, kräftig gerührt – und dazu wie bei allem in Korea: Kimchi. Eingelegter, vergorener Weißkohl. Manche schwören drauf, ich kann dem nichts abgewinnen. Aber was soll’s, probieren gehört dazu.

Zweites Nationalgericht: Korean Barbecue. Hat mich geschmacklich allerdings auch nicht umgehauen. Fleisch, das man selbst am Tisch grillt, dazu einige Sorten – natürlich – Kimchi und das Ganze wird dann mit Reis zusammen in einem dünnen Salatblatt(!) eingerollt. In meinem Fall eine einzige Schweinerei, es tropfte und triefte. Korean Barbecue – auch geschmacklich nicht meins. Dafür aber umso sehenswerter die Stimmung, die von neonbeleuchteter Kantine bis lauter Markthalle reichte.

Demnächst: mal was anderes als Asien.
See you in Cape Town.

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